Forest Carbon Coalition Organizational Members

 

Alaska

Arizona

California

Colorado

Florida

Idaho

Indiana

Louisiana

Massachusetts

Maryland

Missouri

Montana

New Jersey

New Mexico

North Carolina

Ohio

Oregon

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Our mission and history

The Forest Carbon Coalition (FCC) was first organized in 2013 with the overriding goal of shifting the focus of federal forest management nationwide to one that emphasizes the role public forests must play in sequestering and storing carbon to address the climate crisis. By establishing public forests as forest carbon reserves, the US can play a major role in reducing its atmospheric carbon emissions and increasing the resilience of forest ecosystems in the face of climate change.

To advance this goal, FCC convened a science panel composed of 10 top scientists from different universities and the private sector nationwide with knowledge of forest carbon and soils management issues and then collaborated with this panel and our members to develop a comprehensive set of management practices, administrative rules, and policies that could guide the Obama White House.

In 2019, the FCC expanded its mission to include non-federal forestlands managed by states, local governments, private corporations and individuals. Across the US, eighty percent of the most productive forestlands – those capable of capturing and storing the most amount of carbon – are owned by these entities, yet the laws under which these lands are managed are archaic and encourage rapid clearcutting and other industrial forest practices that generate major amounts of greenhouse gas pollution. This approach to forest management also amplifies the public health and safety threats associated with floods, wildfires, harmful algae blooms, landslides, insects and disease as climate change unfolds.

FCC is a project of Center for Sustainable Economy, our tax-exempt fiscal sponsor. For more information about CSE please visit www.sustainable-economy.org

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Team


Project Staff


Heather Campbell, Coalition Coordinator

Heather Campbell, FCC CoordinatorAfter witnessing a clutch of Robin's eggs that she had found on the ground be accidentally squashed by a toddler, Heather Campbell, at age eight, developed a fierce belief that it is our responsibility as humans to honor, respect, and protect the natural world. This event also sparked her curiosity. Why were the eggs on the ground? Where was the mommy bird that laid them? Combined with the encouragement of her marine biologist father, this led to her lifelong love of the natural sciences and pushed her academically to pursue a B.S. in Biology with an emphasis in Ecology. Recognizing that she was more suited to being an advocate than a research scientist, Heather finished her education with dual degrees, a law degree, and a Masters in Environmental Science and Policy. Born and raised in New York, and having spent her entire life to that point on the East Coast (including Pennsylvania, Virginia, and Florida), an internship in Alaska prior to graduation led Heather to the Pacific Northwest in 1996. In Portland, she began her professional career working for a law firm, then spent six years employed by non-profits, shifting to the outdoor recreation industry and then into the corporate world, while still feeding her love of nature through volunteer work. Now a sole proprietor of a health and nutrition business, Heather is excited to join the John Muir Project team to coordinate and elevate the Forest Carbon Coalition and its members. It has been her experience personally and professionally that collective action is stronger than individual action and working with groups who are coalescing around a common goal, but also bring to the fight their own diverse backgrounds, skill sets, and life experiences, is one of the best ways to make effective change. She is ready to roll up her sleeves and ensure that everyone knows how important preserving forest ecosystems is to the climate crisis. Heather lives in Oregon with her rescue pup Mayflower and her shelter cats Molly and Jasper.


John Talberth, Ph.D., Project Manager

talberthDr. Talberth is President and Senior Economist at Center for Sustainable Economy (CSE), an environmental economics think tank based in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Talberth is Co-director of FCC and focuses his work on forest carbon policy analysis and advocacy based on the underlying science and economics.

Prior to CSE, Dr. Talberth was Senior Economist for the People and Ecosystems Program at the World Resources Institute in Washington, DC and Sustainability Indicators Program Director at Redefining Progress in Oakland, California. His environmental economics career began by working to protect ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest in the late 1980s through CSE’s predecessor, Forest Conservation Council, which he directed. Dr. Talberth holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of New Mexico and a master’s in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Oregon. His undergraduate school was the College of William and Mary in Virginia where he earned a BA in Economics and Political Science.

Dr. Talberth has published extensively on topics that include carbon and ecological footprint analysis, sustainable management of forests and farmland, ocean acidification and warming, marine dead zones, and new indicators of progress. His recent sustainability indicators research has been focused on developing new methods for multiscale Genuine Progress Indicator accounts and use of these accounts to inform policy interventions. Another current research priority addresses the climate impacts of industrial forest practices and a menu of policy solutions to help catalyze a transformation to climate smart alternatives.


Steering Committee


Mary Booth, Ph.D

mary-boothDr. Booth is a nationally-recognized advocate known for producing high-quality, data-driven arguments. An ecosystem scientist by training, she received her doctoral degree in Ecology at Utah State University, focusing on biogeochemistry and plant ecophysiology. She completed postdoctoral fellowships at the Ecosystems Center of the Woods Hole Biological Laboratory and the Earth Institute at Columbia University. She currently directs the PFPI’s science and advocacy work on greenhouse gas, air pollutant, and forest impacts of biomass energy and has provided science and policy support to hundreds of activists, researchers, and policy makers across the US and EU.


Adam Colette

Adam-Macon-1501Adam has a passion for organizing people and fighting the corporations whose practices destroy our earth. While attending UNCA, where he graduated with a BS in Environmental Management and Policy, he began his career in activism as an intern for Dogwood Alliance. Since then, Adam has worked with several organizations to fight coal plants, protect our public water systems and build the sharing economy. In his spare time, Adam loves spending time on/in the rivers of Western NC.


Dominick DellaSala, Ph.D.

dominick desalleDr. Dominick A. DellaSala is Chief Scientist at Wild Heritage (www.wild-heritage.org), and former President of the Society for Conservation Biology, North America Section. He is an internationally renowned author of over 300 science papers on forest and fire ecology, conservation biology, endangered species management, and landscape ecology. Dominick has given plenary and keynote talks ranging from academic conferences to the United Nations Earth Summit. He has appeared in National Geographic, Science Digest, Science Magazine, Scientific American, Time Magazine, Audubon Magazine, National Wildlife Magazine, High Country News, Terrain Magazine, NY Times, LA Times, USA Today, Jim Lehrer News Hour, CNN, MSNBC, “Living on Earth (NPR),” several PBS documentaries and even Fox News! Dominick has served on numerous committees, including White House Council task forces on forests and the Oregon’s Global Warming Commission carbon task force reporting to the governor. He is editor of numerous scientific journals and encyclopedias and has published award-winning books on climate change, forest policy, and scientific integrity. Dominick is motivated by his work to leave a living planet for his daughters, grandkids and all those that follow


Chad Hanson, Ph.D.

chad-hansonChad Hanson co-founded the John Muir Project in 1996. He first became involved in national forest protection after hiking the 2,700-mile length of the Pacific Crest Trail from Mexico to Canada with his older brother in 1989. During this hike he witnessed firsthand the devastation caused by rampant commercial logging on our National Forests in California, Oregon and Washington.

Chad finished his Bachelor of Science degree from UCLA after completing the Pacific Crest Trail and then attended law school at the University of Oregon, during which time he also began his career as an environmental advocate working for Native Forest Council and volunteering for the Sierra Club. Chad earned his law degree in 1995, and started the John Muir Project shortly thereafter.

In 2003 Chad returned to school, and earned his Ph.D. in Ecology from the University of California at Davis in 2007, with a research focus on forest and fire ecology and the rare wildlife species that depend upon post-fire habitat in forests of the Sierra Nevada and elsewhere in the western U.S.. He has published an impressive list of scientific research papers on forest and fire ecology, wildlife use of burned forest and fire history and trend.

This past year he and Dominick DellaSala, Ph.D. co-edited and authored several chapters in a new book entitled The Ecological Importance of Mixed-Severity Fires: Nature’s Phoenix which is being published by academic publisher Elsevier due out in June/July of 2015.


Michael Kellet

Michael KellettMichael Kellett has been executive director of RESTORE: The North Woods, since co-founding the organization in 1992. In 1994, he developed the original proposal for a 3.2-million-acre Maine Woods National Park, which laid the groundwork for the 2016 designation of Katahdin Woods and Waters National Monument by President Obama. He co-authored two bills that would designate Reserves on state lands that are permanently protected from logging and other development. He is director of the group’€™s New National Park campaign, seeking to build a nationwide grassroots coalition for 100 new parks across the country. He lives in Lincoln, Massachusetts.


Susan Leopold, PhD

Susan Leopold, PhDSusan is a board member of the Center for Sustainable Economy and presently Executive Director of one of FCC's member groups – United Plant Savers – who has been a staunch advocate for biodiverse forests not only for climate benefits but for other ecosystem services and economic value that directly impacts local communities such as ecotourism, non-timber products, medicinal and edible plants. She will be working in DC with partner organizations to advance FCC's forest carbon goals before Congress and within natural resource agencies. Susan has a Doctorate in Ethnobotany from Antioch New England, and a Master's in Environment Landscape Design from the Conway School.


Heather MacSlarrow

Heather MacSlarrowHeather grew up in Northwest Washington and Hong Kong, both of which gave her an appreciation for wilderness and solitude.  She received her Bachelor's Degree in Environmental Studies from the University of Montana, and from there embarked on a 10-year adventure in public land and Wilderness stewardship with conservation corps across the West from Arizona to Alaska.  She worked with the Washington Conservation Corps, Rocky Mountain Youth Corps in Steamboat Springs, Montana Conservation Corps, Youth Corps of Southern Arizona, Southwest Conservation Corps in Tucson, and Southwest Conservation Corps in Salida.  Her last position in corps was as the founder and Executive Director of the Southwest Conservation Corps in Salida, Colorado.  Heather left corps work to pursue her Masters of Natural Resources through the University of Idaho and work with the Colorado Mountain Club as the Lands Director.  Through these positions, Heather worked with many Wilderness Areas, including: Buffalo Peaks, Collegiate Peaks, Sangre de Cristo, Great Sand Dunes, Spanish Peaks, South San Juan, Weminuche, La Garita, Admiralty Island, Glacier Bay, Wrangell Saint Elias, Misty Fjords, Kenai, Organ Pipe, Chiricahua, Gila, Saguaro, Rincon Mountain, North and South Maricopa Mountains, Superstition, Carlsbad Caverns, Guadalupe Mountains, Selway Bitterroot, Rattlesnake, Mission Mountains, Bob Marshall, Mount Zirkel, and High Uintas.

Heather is highly dedicated to the professional stewardship and management of Wilderness.  She sees this as the key to allowing Wilderness to do what Wilderness does best - facilitate life-changing experiences and maintain important ecological systems, both of which provide essential support for, and strengthen, our communities.


Ernie Niemi

ernieErnie co-founded FCC in 2013, and currently serves as its Co-director, with a focus on coalition engagement, synthesizing science, and communication with decision makers. He specializes in applying the principles of cost-benefit analysis, economic valuation, and economic-impact analysis to describe the economic importance of natural resources. He formed Natural Resource Economics, Inc. in 2012. From 1978 to 2012, he managed economic and policy analysis for the consulting firm, ECONorthwest, where he was a co-owner, vice president, and senior economist. He also has taught cost-benefit analysis and economic development for the University of Oregon’s Department of Planning, Public Policy, and Management, and taught high-school science as a Peace Corps Volunteer in Uganda.

He has described the economic importance of market and non-market goods and services derived from diverse ecosystems: dryland, montane, riparian, lake, river, forest, grassland, urban, savannah, estuarine, marine, coastal plain, island.

His analyses have addressed resource-management programs for water quantity, quality, and reliability; economic security for at-risk human communities; conservation of at-risk fish, wildlife, and plant species; management of natural-resource risks; adaptation of households, businesses, and communities to expected changes in climate; management of public lands and waters; diversion of surface and ground water for irrigation, livestock, domestic, and municipal-industrial uses; maintenance or enhancement of in-stream flows; water conservation; forest restoration; and floodplain management.

His descriptions of the economic importance of natural resources have covered marginal and aggregate estimation of market value and social value (including cultural value); impacts of resource-management alternatives on commercial and non-commercial (including subsistence) components of surrounding economies; and the distribution of positive and negative economic outcomes among existing groups and across current and future generations.

Much of his work has entailed describing the market and non-market competition for natural resources, identifying externalities associated with different resource uses (costs and benefits that accrue to those outside the decision-making process), and tracing the effects of the externalities on competitive outcomes.

He has presented analytical findings on resource-management issues to congressional, judicial, arbitrative, administrative, multi-national, and scientific/professional bodies.


John Talberth, Ph.D.

talberthDr. Talberth is President and Senior Economist at Center for Sustainable Economy (CSE), an environmental economics think tank based in Portland, Oregon. Dr. Talberth is Co-director of FCC and focuses his work on forest carbon policy analysis and advocacy based on the underlying science and economics.

Prior to CSE, Dr. Talberth was Senior Economist for the People and Ecosystems Program at the World Resources Institute in Washington, DC and Sustainability Indicators Program Director at Redefining Progress in Oakland, California. His environmental economics career began by working to protect ancient forests of the Pacific Northwest in the late 1980s through CSE’s predecessor, Forest Conservation Council, which he directed. Dr. Talberth holds a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of New Mexico and a master’s in Urban and Regional Planning from the University of Oregon. His undergraduate school was the College of William and Mary in Virginia where he earned a BA in Economics and Political Science.

Dr. Talberth has published extensively on topics that include carbon and ecological footprint analysis, sustainable management of forests and farmland, ocean acidification and warming, marine dead zones, and new indicators of progress. His recent sustainability indicators research has been focused on developing new methods for multiscale Genuine Progress Indicator accounts and use of these accounts to inform policy interventions. Another current research priority addresses the climate impacts of industrial forest practices and a menu of policy solutions to help catalyze a transformation to climate smart alternatives.


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Join FCC as an organizational member

Securing climate smart forest policies on federal, state, and private lands across the US is a major challenge. But by creating synergies between experts and advocates across a wide range of fields and approaches the Forest Carbon Coalition seeks to position itself and its members to be ready to respond to threats and opportunities wherever they arise. Please help us achieve this goal by becoming an organizational member. Members engage with us in in the design of forest carbon policies and initiatives, stay up to date on emerging science and can rely on the expertise and experience of the coalition to achieve their goals.